Purim should be celebrated with a special festive meal on Purim Day, usually after Mincha (afternoon prayers) at which family and friends gather together to rejoice in the Purim spirit.

Purim is a preparation for Peach. Through the mitzvah of Purim, we are protected from chametz on Pesach (Likutey Moharan II, 74).

Purim should be celebrated with a special festive meal on Purim Day, usually after Mincha (afternoon prayers) at which family and friends gather together to rejoice in the Purim spirit. It is a mitzvah to drink wine or other inebriating drinks at this meal.

If the meal extends into the evening, as it usually does, Al Hanisim, a special prayer recounting the miracle of the day, is still added to the Birchat Hamazon, the “Grace after meals.”

Because the miracle of Purim came thru wine, – Vashti’s downfall and Haman’s downfall came as a result of a wine feast, the Rabbis of the Talmud (usually a quite sober group) said:

The Talmud instructs us that on Purim we should drink until wee knows not the difference between “Blessed be Mordecai” and “Cursed be Haman.” Interestingly, the numerical value of the Hebrew letters in each of the phrases, “baruch Mordechai” “Blessed by Mordechai” and “arur Haman” “Cursed be Haman” amounts to a total of 502.

“On Purim, one should drink – Ahd D’lo Yoda Bain Arur Haman L’Boruch Mordechai” – “Until he can no longer tell the difference between ‘Cursed be Haman’ and ‘Blessed be Mordechai.’ ” (Tractate Megilah 7b).

A person who can’t or won’t drink may fulfill the “Ahd D’lo Yoda” requirement by sleeping, because one who sleeps also doesn’t know the difference between a curse and a blessing.

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